June 2022

Dear CUAA Community,

As spring semester comes to a close, I hope that you all have a moment to relax, travel, or focus on your research. This newsletter is long overdue, and I apologize for its delay. May was, well, full of surprises. But life has returned to its more predictable rhythms. Moving forward, you can expect an updated newsletter each month. 

As always, please continue to share publications, professional opportunities, and events with me. The deadline for that information to be included in next month’s newsletter is June 20th. Don’t hesitate to email me at nathan.romine.183 @my.csun.edu.

Sincerely,  

Nathan Romine

Announcements

Teaching the City Digital Workshop: Next Steps

We’d like to thank everyone that participated in this year’s digital workshop. Each of the presentations and their attendant discussions were lively and thought provoking. Scholars and practitioners that are interested in further investigating what sits at the core of our educational and pedagogical explorations of urban space and would like to organize additional discussions or events should contact Suzanne.Scheld@csun.edu.

2022 CUAA Graduate Student Paper Prize Competition

The Critical Urban Anthropology Association (CUAA) is pleased to announce its graduate student paper prize competition. We are seeking papers that address CUAA’s interests, including urban life, space and place, poverty and homelessness, infrastructure, urban governance, social movements, transnational and global intersections, refugees and immigration. The prize includes a cash award of $250. The winner will be announced at the 2022 AAA meetings in Seattle.   

Authors who are current graduate students or who have graduated within the 2022 calendar year are eligible for the competition, as long as the submission was composed during enrollment in a graduate program. Submissions will be accepted from both faculty and the students themselves. Letters of recommendation/justification are not required, nor is CUAA membership.

International entries are encouraged, but papers must be submitted in English. Papers should be no more than 30 double-spaced pages, including bibliography, notes and images/figures, and in 12-point font. The paper’s formatting (e.g., citations, bibliographies, etc.) should be consistent throughout.  

Papers should be submitted by email to Suzanne Scheld (Suzanne.scheld@csun.edu) by September 1, 2022. Please direct any queries about the award or alternative submission arrangements to her.

2022 CUAA Undergraduate Student Paper Prize Competition

The Critical Urban Anthropology Association (CUAA) is pleased to announce its undergraduate paper prize competition. We are seeking student papers that address CUAA’s interests, including urban life, space and place, poverty and homelessness, infrastructure, urban governance, social movements, transnational and global intersections, refugees and immigration. The prize includes a cash award of $150. The winner will be announced at the 2022 AAA meetings in Seattle.

Any author who is a current undergraduate or who graduated in the 2022 calendar year is eligible for the competition, as long as the submission was composed while the student was an undergraduate.  

Papers should be no more than 30 double-spaced pages, 12-point font, including bibliography, notes and images/figures. The paper’s formatting (e.g., citations, bibliographies etc.) should be consistent throughout. International entries are encouraged, although papers must be submitted in English.  

Please send submissions by email to Suzanne Scheld (suzanne.scheld@csun.edu). Please direct any queries about the award or alternative submission arrangements to her.

Publications

A Research Agenda for Design Inequalities in the City, Urban Parks, and Beyond

Galen Cranz, Professor Emerita of Architecture at the University of California, Berkeley

Leonardo Chiesi, Associate Professor of Architecture at the University of California, Berkeley

“Our thinking about the role of design in social inequalities has emerged from decades of combined experience as sociologists teaching design. When Cranz, a new PhD sociologist, starting teaching architecture students full time in 1971, neither sociology nor design acknowledged the inequalities built into design. Class was hard to discuss because it implicitly understood that there was little an architect could do about it; the design problem was set by the studio instructor and the class components were implicitly baked into the site and the task and not discussed. Chiesi’s experience also suggests that the role of class is not explicitly addressed, neither challenged nor advocated in the context of Italian architectural education.  The design problems typically assigned in studios revolve around matters of form, structure, materials and “good taste,” and rarely, if ever, address class-related implications of the designers’ choices. We conclude that the role of class in design has remained powerful but relatively silent, and the presence of sociologists or social scientists in general has declined over the last decades, due to budget cuts and faculty downsizing (in fact, those who were most affected by the downsizing were research positions) and to a lessening of social activism.  As a corrective we would like to offer a research agenda to future scholars so that they might be able to demonstrate and assess the relationships between inequalities and designs. Such an agenda ideally covers all levels of analysis and all sectors of society. We start with observations about the ways in which class inequalities have worked their way into the design of urban parks.”

Awards

Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition (SAFN) Annual Anthropology Day Photo Contest

The overall winner of the 2022 SAFN Anthropology Day Photo Contest is B. Lynne Milgram, of OCAD University in Toronto, Canada. The judges were impressed by the balance in the photos, and the textured invocation of life in the market.

 In addition to appearing here, some of these photographs appear in

Milgram, B. Lynne and Lorelei C. Mendoza. 2021. Repositioning the Edge: The Resilience of a Wholesale Vegetable Market in Benguet, Northern Philippines. In Norms and Illegality: Intimate Ethnographies and Politics. Cristiana Panella and Walter E. Little, eds., 137-159. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.